2020 is when cybersecurity gets even weirder, so get ready

The continued expansion of the Internet of Things will greatly increase the number of devices and applications that security teams will have to protect. That’s hard for teams that have been used to protecting just PCs and servers and now have to worry about everything from smart air-conditioning units or vending machines in the canteen, right through to power plants and industrial machinery.
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These are the worst hacks, cyberattacks, and data breaches of 2019

When a data breach occurs, companies will usually haul in third-party investigators, notify regulators, promise to do better and give any impacted consumers free credit monitoring — but we’ve reached a stage where you should consider signing up to such services anyway, given how much of our information is now available in data dumps strewn all over the internet.
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UWF announces global cyber security workforce development partnership

According to a recent release, The University of West Florida and the Jikei College Group in Japan announced a partnership to enhance the global cybersecurity workforce development. The new agreement will promote educational collaboration in cybersecurity which is aimed to strengthen workforce development in the growing cybersecurity industry.

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How Agencies Can Use Open Source Intelligence to Close Cybersecurity Loopholes

OSINT efforts got a big boost with the rise of the internet and then another huge one when social media went mainstream. Skilled intelligence agents no longer have to always cultivate sources in rival governments or perform dangerous operations in unfriendly territory. Instead, they can sometimes get just as valuable information by connecting the dots and linking several publicly available information snippets into a much larger picture. It’s still a lot of work, but mostly conducted from the safety of a computer terminal sitting at their office.

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In the last 10 months, 140 local governments, police stations and hospitals have been held hostage by ransomware attacks

The attack starts, innocently enough, with an email. But when someone clicks the link inside, hackers quickly take over. Computers at the school, hospital, or city government are locked, and the only way for employees to get back in is to pay the attacker hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of Bitcoin. Even then, there’s no guarantee they won’t do it again.

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