Internet of Things Infographic

In November of 2015, a group of teens broke into a Baltimore, MD man’s home, stealing his bicycle and jeep. The jeep was later abandoned, and the crime would likely not have been solved, but for evidence collected from the man’s home surveillance system, and the car’s electronic audio system. Click here for the full story. This is just one of many examples describing the trend in internet-enabled devices, and how they collect and record many forms of digital information (such as voice, video, fitness, etc.) that may become digital evidence in the course of a police investigation.

The infographic presented below illustrates 5 categories of electronic devices that may be found in a residential home. Where possible, we describe the technologies imbedded within the devices, and the kinds of data they generate. While some devices store data on the device itself, others act as sensors that transmit data back to a smartphone application, cloud service provider, or other remote location. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive, but rather suggestive of the many kinds of devices available today, and they are not meant as an endorsement of any vendor or manufacturer.

A note to law enforcement officers: As with any crime scene investigation, in order to determine which devices could be relevant in the course of an investigation, you should use your expert judgment, and additionally consult with the District Attorney or Assistant State Attorney (or Assistant U.S. Attorney for federal investigations). Further, a warrant may be required to collect digital evidence from smartphones or other digital devices found on a person who has just been arrested (see the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Riley v. California).

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In November of 2015, a group of teens broke into a Baltimore, MD man’s home, stealing his bicycle and jeep. The jeep was later abandoned, and the crime would likely not have been solved, but for evidence collected from the man’s home surveillance system, and the car’s electronic audio system. Click here for the full story.

This is just one of many examples describing the trend in internet-enabled devices, and how they collect and record many forms of digital information (such as voice, video, fitness, etc.) that may become digital evidence in the course of a police investigation.

The infographic presented below illustrates 5 categories of electronic devices that may be found in a residential home. Where possible, we describe the technologies imbedded within the devices, and the kinds of data they generate. While some devices store data on the device itself, others act as sensors that transmit data back to a smartphone application, cloud service provider, or other remote location. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive, but rather suggestive of the many kinds of devices available today, and they are not meant as an endorsement of any vendor or manufacturer.

A note to law enforcement officers: As with any crime scene investigation, in order to determine which devices could be relevant in the course of an investigation, you should use your expert judgment, and additionally consult with the District Attorney or Assistant State Attorney (or Assistant U.S. Attorney for federal investigations). Further, a warrant may be required to collect digital evidence from smartphones or other digital devices found on a person who has just been arrested (see the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Riley v. California).

 

If you have encountered a particular internet-enabled device in the course of an investigation and would like to suggest we include it, please click on the Contribute Content button below and provide as much information as possible.
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